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Prothesis
Platitera
Holy Cross
Antiprothesis
Resurrection Gospel
Crucifixion Gospel
Epistle SS. Peter & Paul
Epistle St. Andrew
Antiminsion
Resurrection Cross
Crucifixion Cross
Fan
Tabernacle
Epitaphion
Theotokos
Platiera

The Prothesis
Feast Day: December 25
Click here to learn about the Prothesis

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The Platitera
Click here to learn about the Root of Jesse

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The Holy Cross
Feast Day: September 14
Click here to learn about the exaltation of the Holy Cross

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The Antiprothesis
Feast Day: Monday after Pentecost

The Hospitality of Abraham, an Old Testament type of the Holy Trinity.
Explanation of the Trinity God is not an impersonal essence or mere "higher power," but rather each of the divine persons relates to mankind personally. Neither is God a simple name for three gods (i.e., polytheism), but rather the Orthodox faith is monotheist and yet Trinitarian. The God of the Orthodox Christian Church is the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, the I AM who revealed himself to Moses in the burning bush.

The source and unity of the Holy Trinity is the Father, from whom the Son is begotten and also from whom the Spirit proceeds. Thus, the Father is both the ground of unity of the Trinity and also of distinction. To try to comprehend unbegottenness (Father), begottenness (Son), or procession (Holy Spirit) leads to insanity, says the holy Gregory the Theologian, and so the Church approaches God in divine mystery, approaching God apophatically, being content to encounter God personally and yet realize the inadequacy of the human mind to comprehend Him.

Since man is made in the image of God, man also has three natures. Both man and woman have three parts: body, soul, and spirit. God the Son is comparable to the body since the Son is God incarnate. God the Father is comparable to the soul, or mind, since he was the mind that created everything. The Holy Spirit is comparable to man's Spirit. As the body of man is the temple of our spirit, the body of Jesus Christ is the temple to the Holy Spirit which proceeds from the Father through (dia) the Son.

The primary statement of what the Church believes about God is to be found in the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed.

Source: http://orthodoxwiki.org/Holy_Trinity

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Resurrection Gospel

Jesus Christ is the Word of God. Therefore, the Gospel is gilt or embroidered to reflect its importance. Only the Gospel and the Tabernacle are permitted to stay om the Gospel. On Sundays the Gospel is Resurrection Side up.
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Crucifixion Gospel
Jesus Christ is the Word of God. Therefore, the Gospel is gilt or embroidered to reflect its importance. Only the Gospel and the Tabernacle are permitted to stay om the Gospel. On weekdays the Gospel is Crucifixion Side up.

Click here to learn about the Passion

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Epistle- SS. Peter and Paul
The Epistles are the letters written by the Early Church Leaders to the Christian Communities that bear the name of their Letters. St. Paul wrote many of these Letters. St. Peter, in addition to writing his universal letter, also symbolized with St. Paul the conciliator nature of the Church

Click here to learn about the life of SS. Peter and Paul.

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Epistle- St. Andrew
The Epistles are the letters written by the Early Church Leaders to the Christian Communities that bear the name of their Letters. St. Andrew is known as the Fist Called Apostle. The word Apostle means to send out, which is what Jesus Christ commissioned his servants to do, to preach the Gospel to the four corners of the world.

Click here to learn about the life of St. Andrew the First Called.

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The Antimension
Click here to learn about the Antimension.

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Processional Cross - Resurrection Side
The Processional Cross leads the majority of processions as it symbolizes that the Cross is our invincible standard.

You who were lifted on the cross voluntarily, * O Christ our God, bestow Your tender compassions * upon Your new community to which You gave Your name. * Cause our faithful emperors to be glad in Your power, * granting them the victories against their adversaries. * And for an ally, Lord, may they have You, * peace as their armor, the trophy invincible.

On Sundays the Cross faces Resurrection Side out.
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Processional Cross - Crucifixion Side
The Processional Cross leads the majority of processions as it symbolizes that the Cross is our invincible standard.

You who were lifted on the cross voluntarily, * O Christ our God, bestow Your tender compassions * upon Your new community to which You gave Your name. * Cause our faithful emperors to be glad in Your power, * granting them the victories against their adversaries. * And for an ally, Lord, may they have You, * peace as their armor, the trophy invincible.

On Sundays the Cross faces Crucifixion Side out.
Click here to learn about the Passion

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Processional Fan - Eξαπτέρυγα Hexapteryga
Above him were seraphim, each with six wings: With two wings they covered their faces, with two they covered their feet, and with two they were flying. - Isaiah 6:2

The Seraphim serve in the Altar of Heaven. They are placed on the fans to symbolize the Altar Servers as the Angels serving the Altar.

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Tabernacle
The Tabernacle of the Old Testament held the Ten Commandments, the Rod of Aaron, and the Manna from Heaven. The Tabernacle in the Altar houses the "Reserve Sacrament"

The Theotokos mystically represents the tabernacle because she housed in her womb the Ten Commandments (The Law Giver), the Rod of Aaron (The Resurrected Lord), and the Manna from Heaven (The Bread of Life). It is for this reason that the Prophet Zacharias placed her in the Holy of Holies.

Click here to learn about the Feast of the Entrance of the Theotokos.

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Epitaphion

As an act of piety, Joseph of Arimathea seeks permission from Pilate to remove the body of Jesus from the Cross. Hastily, and without adequate preparation of the body, Jesus is wrapped in a linen shroud for his burial. From a hymn on Holy Friday we sing: "Woe is me, sweet Jesus, Whom but a while ago, when the sun beheld suspended upon the Cross, it was shrouded in darkness, the earth quaked with fear, and the Veil of the Temple was rent asunder. Albeit, I see that You willingly endure death for my sake. How then shall I array You, my God? How shall I wrap You with linen? Or what dirges shall I chant for Your funeral? Wherefore, O compassionate Lord, I magnify Your Passion, and praise Your Burial with Your Resurrection, crying, Lord, glory to You!"

The death of our Savior was for the salvation of all humankind. In this icon of the Lord’s burial we become the witnesses to the Holy Gospel. The face of Christ bears no bitterness, but rather expresses a feeling of total inner peace and tranquility. The Virgin Mother of God embraces the body of her Son with extreme tenderness. This is her moment of grief and yet, it is also one of acceptance. St. John the Evangelist leans over the body of Christ, as Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus begin to place the body into the linen shroud. Christ has encountered death and we await the announcement of His victory over death. We await the celebration of His glorious Resurrection.
-Source

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Panagia of Mt. Athos

This modern icon shows the Virgin without her Divine Son, which is rare in Orthodox iconography. Here we see her standing on Mount Athos (a monastic pennisula dedicated to her, now in northeastern Greece), called the Garden of the Theotokos, where she is considered the head of every monastic enclosure on this sacred land. For over a thousand years this monastic enclave has nurtured the life of monasticism and the Church by producing hundreds and hundreds of living Saints. May they continue to do so in every generation to come!

Church tradition tells us that when the Virgin was journeying to Cyprus to visit St. Lazarus, the ship was blown off course, so it anchored at Mount Athos. When the Holy Virgin came ashore, the many idols and temples of demons there toppled and crashed at once. She blessed the peninsula, saying. “Let this spot be my portion; here let me abide.” She then reembarked and returned to her home near the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem. This was her first visit to Mt. Athos, but it was by no means her last or final appearance on the Holy Mountain.

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The Platitera

Panagia is also the term for a particular type of icon of the Theotokos, wherein she is facing the viewer directly, usually depicted full length with her hands in the orans position, and with a medallion showing the image of Christ as a child in front of her chest.[1] This medallion symbolically represents Jesus within the womb of the Virgin Mary at the moment of the Incarnation. This type of icon is also called the Platytéra (Greek: Πλατυτέρα, literally wider or more spacious): poetically, by containing the Creator of the Universe in her womb, Mary has become Platytera ton ouranon (Πλατυτέρα τῶν Ουρανῶν), "more spacious than the Heavens". This type is also sometimes called the Virgin of the Sign or Our Lady of the Sign, a reference to Isaiah 7:14:

Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel.

Such an image is often placed on the inside of the apse which rises directly over the altar of Orthodox churches. In contrast with standard religious mosaics which usually have gold backgrounds, the Platytera is often depicted on a dark blue background, sometimes dotted with gold stars: a reference to the Heavens.
As with most Orthodox icons of Mary, the letters ΜΡ ΘΥ (short for ΜΗΤΗΡ ΘΕΟΥ, "Mother of God") are usually placed on the upper left and right of the halo of the Virgin Mary.
References
Great Panagia, History of Russian Painting, by Boguslawski
St. Paul's Irvine Archived 2006-03-05 at the Wayback Machine
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